Citaten




The big financial companies need to be involved early to identify where blockchain will eat their profits

2015 Eric Piscini
principal banking technology Deloitte




The days of [banks] holding on to people's money a little bit longer and benefiting from that, or charging people fees and high margins on exchange rates, are going to end

2015 Susan Athey
professor of the economics of technology




We don’t have the imagination to recognize what is possible once you set up this blockchain technology

2015 Robert Greifeld
CEO Nasdaq OMX




Saying we’re just going to disrupt a bank, an exchange or card network because we have a protocol and we’re going to put an app on it – that’s pretty unlikely. It’s unlikely not because it isn’t going to happen. It will happen. But there are several things that need to happen first

2015 Adam Ludwin
CEO of chain.com




You have front-end systems trading at warp speed, and nanoseconds of competitive advantage are being extracted, and yet the back end of Wall Street hasn’t been fundamentally overhauled in decades

2015 Blythe Masters
creator of the Credit Default Swap




The blockchain is going to bring levels of efficiency to the financial markets that we’ve never seen before. In time, it could be as impactful on the back office as electronic trading was on open outcry

2015 Robert Greifeld
CEO Nasdaq OMX




The technology is potentially great, but you’re going to have to bring along all the regulators and the banks to change the ecosystem

2015 Hank Uberoi
former co-head of Goldman Sachs’s global technology operations




A private blockchain run by banks could end up as just “another cartel” and function as poorly as the payments consortium

2015 Jon Matonis
founding director of the Bitcoin Foundation




Banking cartels could use private blockchains as blockades

2015 Jon Matonis
founding director of the Bitcoin Foundation




And then, after a bit, we will ask ourselves: why do we need a bank to run the blockchain again?

2015 Jon Matonis
founding director of the Bitcoin Foundation




We should call private blockchains what they really are: wealth transfer mechanisms from banks to fintech consultants

2015 Jon Matonis
founding director of the Bitcoin Foundation




I spent my whole career thinking about risk, markets, infrastructure, and regulation. I had seen the financial crisis unfold, and I had seen the credit derivatives market get operationally ahead of itself, which resulted in systemic risk counterparty exposures. I began to believe that distributed ledgers had the capability to tackle that problem

2015 Blythe Masters
former CFO J.P.Morgan's Investment Bank




If banks were to embrace permissionless blockchains they could participate as well or better than the newcomers

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




Bureaucracies are so heavily invested in the expertise and importance of local regulations and standards that it's extremely difficult for them to cut the Gordian knot and implement seamless global systems

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




[Bureaucracies] keep trying to re-inject points of control, and thus points of vulnerability, into blockchains, e.g. through 'permissioning'; but this nullifies their main benefits, which come from removing points of vulnerability

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




If banks want benefits of blockchains they must go permissionless

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




Proper financial controls are already somewhat decentralised, thanks to a "human blockchain" of accountants, auditors, etc. checking each others' work

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




To remove vulnerability banks have to remove individual human control and the individuals in charge or with root access. Banks naturally hate that loss to their power. But they don't have any choice if they want to gain the benefits of having an army of independent computers that rigorously, constantly and securely check each others' work

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




Decentralization is what allows Bitcoin to substitute an army of computers for an army of accountants, investigators, and lawyers

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




Smart contracts solve the problem of trust by being self-executing

2015 Nick Szabo
Inventor of Smart Contracts




Using a blockchain format, banks can receive payments or make loans to another bank with the assurance that the counterparty is not sitting on some mountain of toxic debt, for instance

2015 Adam Back
inventor of blockchain proof-of-work system




Banks can't use an open network currently because their whole security model relies on reconciliation and trust and private networks and armed guards and all that kind of stuff

2015 Adam Back
inventor of blockchain proof-of-work system




I think you could also make the claim that ultimately regulators should see that this is good for consumers with potentially more lightly regulated financial products and institutions that are blockchain real-time audited

2015 Adam Back
inventor of blockchain proof-of-work system




It's quite interesting to see the removal of third party trust because in many ways the fees of the financial system and the companies involved in that charge, are related to trust and reputation

2015 Adam Back
inventor of blockchain proof-of-work system




Significantly reducing dependence on trust on third parties from the system should ultimately reduce systemic risk

2015 Adam Back
inventor of blockchain proof-of-work system




On the blockchain, nobody knows you're a fridge

2014 Richard Gendal Brown
Executive Architect for Banking Industry Innovation at IBM




Anything that requires proof of ownership through paper today can be replaced by the blockchain

2015 Derek White
Barclays’ chief design officer




I believe Bitcoin is the most important thing in the world today

2015 Nicholas Negroponte
Founder of MIT




It will be everywhere and the world will have to readjust. World governments will have to readjust

2013 John McAfee




I understand the political ramifications of [blockchain] and I think that government should stay out of them and they should be perfectly legal

2013 Ron Paul
US Presidential candidate




We`re bootstrapping an entire economy from scratch

2013 Jeff Garzik
Blockchain core developer




What will likely happen is there will be a lot of interest [in federated blockchains], a lot of discussion, and I think you'll see some money get deployed, but they will capitulate and shift their attention back to the bitcoin blockchain or some decentralized blockchain solution

2015 Barry Silbert
Founder & CEO SecondMarket




A private federated blockchain doesn't solve any major problems and ultimately I don't have a high level of optimism it's going to succeed. I'm surprised they haven't figured that out yet and I'm surprised they are doing that first

2015 Barry Silbert
Founder & CEO SecondMarket




Whereas these ideas around federated blockchain, any time you put two banks in a room, let alone nine, it's a setup for a disaster or a long process

2015 Barry Silbert
Founder & CEO SecondMarket




Big banks creating their own blockchain is to bitcoin what Che Guevara is to a T-shirt of Che Guevara being worn by a hipster in Brooklyn

Andreas Antonopoulos
Author Mastering Bitcoin




Permissionless ledgers don’t solve any of the banks’ problems, permissioned ledgers solve many of the banks’ problems

Dave Birch
One of the world’s leading experts on digital money




Banks will likely try to silo 'the blockchain' just as media companies tried to silo the internet in the 90's

Eric Voorhees
Serial blockchain entrepreneur and investor




The way blockchain can simplify banking is by reducing operational risk and costs as well at the same time improving capital efficiencies

2015 Alex Batlin
CTO applied innovation UBS AG




Despite banks attempts to test and use blockchain technology for their own commercial gain, it is outside the realm of possibility for the technology to serve any useful purpose for the intermediaries it was designed to replace. That is akin to burdening horses with engines in the name of technological innovation.

2016 Saifedean Ammous
assistant professor of economics at the Lebanese-American University